Speaker Bios

Jed Dearybury

Jed Dearybury 
Spartanburg School District 6 
"BreakoutEDU"

Jed Dearybury is a 15-year veteran of education with 13 years in the early childhood classroom in Spartanburg 6, and is the current Director of Professional Development & Communications for the Palmetto State Teachers Association (PSTA). During his classroom tenure, Jed received numerous awards. He was featured in GQ Magazine, met President Obama, and was named as a top 5 finalist for South Carolina Teacher of the Year because of his passion, love, and success in education. He eagerly seeks to promote public education in South Carolina.   

"BreakoutEDU"

BreakoutEDU Are you looking for ways to bring the 5 Cs of 21st Century learning into your classroom? BreakoutEDU is exactly what you have been looking for. Breakout EDU creates ultra-engaging learning games for people of all ages while growing creativity, critical-thinking, collaboration, communication, and community building skills. Games (Breakouts) teach teamwork, problem solving, and troubleshooting by presenting participants with challenges that ignite their natural drive to problem-solve. Breakouts are perfect for classrooms, staff trainings, dinner parties, and at home with the family! At the end of a Breakout, your players will be eager for the next! Speciality K-12 Breakouts can be used to teach core academic subjects including math, science, history, language arts and have embedded standards that apply problem solving strategies within a real world OR collaborative context. Want to know more? Join me for this high energy, hands-on learning session.

Lorraine DeJong

Lorraine DeJong, Ph.D. 
Furman University 
"Why Girls Get Better Grades Than Boys and What Teachers Can Do to Close the Gap"

Dr. Lorraine DeJong is the coordinator of Early Childhood Education at Furman University and has been an active participant at this conference for many years. She teaches courses in human and child development and her primary professional interests include early childhood teacher education curriculum development and pedagogy, including the study of effective ways for teacher education to weave diversity into the fabric of all coursework and field experiences. She is the past president of the South Carolina Association for the Education of Young Children and the South Carolina Association of Teacher Educators.

Greg Peterson will be speaking with Lorraine Dejong. He is a sophomore education major at Furman University, with an interest in special education. He is currently the sports editor of the Paladin, which is Furman's student newspaper, and is involved in Baptist Collegiate Ministries and Fellowship of Christian Athletes.

 "Why Girls Get Better Grades Than Boys and What Teachers Can Do to Close the Gap"

Across all grade levels and academic subjects, girls earn higher grades than boys, and it starts as early as kindergarten. This session will share some of the recent research related to gender differences in learning and achievement and offer suggestions for how teachers can more effectively support boys in school. The session will specifically examine how current grading and instructional practices may contribute to diminished achievement for male students and offer specific suggestions for classroom and teaching practices found to be particularly effective when teaching boys, that will help close the gender gap in education.

Tina Herzberg

Tina Herzberg, Ph.D. 
USC Upstate 
"Understanding How Children with Visual Impairments Can Learn and Thrive in Your Classroom"

Dr. Tina Herzberg is an Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Programs for the School of Education at the University of South Carolina Upstate. She received her Bachelor of Arts degree in Mathematics and English with secondary teaching certification from Angelo State University and her Master of Education degree in Special Education with a Specialization in the Education of the Visually Impaired from Texas Tech University. She also holds a Ph.D. in Special Education Leadership and Interagency Collaboration from Texas A&M University. She has 25 years of experience in education, with 21 in the field of visual impairment. Prior to her arrival at USC Upstate, she served as a general education classroom teacher, an itinerant teacher of students with visual impairment, specialist for a regional service center and adjunct instructor. Her current research interests include braille literacy, transcription of print into braille, tactile graphics and supporting students who are transitioning from print literacy programs to braille literacy programs.

"Understanding How Children with Visual Impairments Can Learn and Thrive in Your Classroom" 

This presentation will focus on information related to different types of visual impairments, how this can affect educational performance, and accommodations that can be used in the classroom. There also will be several hands-on activities for participants to interact with low vision simulators, low vision devices, and other tools that may be used by students with visual impairments.   

Moryah Jackson

Moryah Jackson 
University of South Carolina 
"Your Power as a Teacher – Helping Students Break the Cycle of Poverty"

Moryah Jackson has served in higher education for over ten years advancing access, equity and opportunity. She is currently the assistant director of diversity, inclusion and community engagement at the University of South Carolina.

She began her career in higher education at Midlands Technical College. She later served as an apprenticeship consultant with Apprenticeship Carolina, an innovative workforce development program recognized by the Department of Labor and White House, where she scaled the program across 19 counties in the state. Most recently, she was quoted in Sir Ken Robinson’s book Creative Schools for her grassroots work successfully launching TransformSC, a public-private partnership working to redesign public education in South Carolina. After her experience running for Richland One School Board, Moryah continued to work with public schools to improve student success by focusing on literacy and college readiness.

Jackson earned a bachelor's degree from Columbia College and a master of public administration from the University of South Carolina.  She is currently a doctoral candidate at the University of Florida. Jackson studied at the Anglo-American University in Prague, Czech Republic and served as a United States State Department Fellow in Washington, D.C. and Maseru, Lesotho.

"Your Power as a Teacher – Helping Students Break the Cycle of Poverty"

Research suggests that a single teacher can shape the course of a young person’s future. The invisible nature of social class creates barriers in the classroom, but teachers have the power to help students overcome. Learn ten practical tips to help you unleash your power and help students break the cycle of poverty.   

Justin Kaiser

Justin Kaiser, Ph.D. 
USC Upstate 
"Understanding How Children with Visual Impairments Can Learn and Thrive in Your Classroom"

Dr. Justin Kaiser is an Assistant Professor in the Visual Impairment program at the University of South Carolina Upstate. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from West Virginia University. He received his Master of Education degree in Vision Studies from the University of Pittsburgh. Justin also graduated with his doctorate in Vision Studies and Special Education from the University of Pittsburgh. He is certified as a Teacher of Students with Visual Impairments and Orientation and Mobility Specialist. Justin also has worked as a Teacher of Students with Visual Impairments and Orientation and Mobility Specialist for the Saint Louis Society for the Blind and Visually Impaired and the Allegheny Intermediate Unit in Pittsburgh PA. He is also in the process of creating an Orientation and Mobility certification program at USC Upstate.

"Understanding How Children with Visual Impairments Can Learn and Thrive in Your Classroom" 

This presentation will focus on information related to different types of visual impairments, how this can affect educational performance, and accommodations that can be used in the classroom. There also will be several hands-on activities for participants to interact with low vision simulators, low vision devices, and other tools that may be used by students with visual impairments.   

Charles Love

Dr. Charles Love 
USC Upstate

Dr. Charles Love is the current interim dean of the School of Education at USC Upstate. He was dean of the School of Education from 1999 to 2012. Prior to becoming dean, he held the faculty rank of full professor of curriculum and instruction and educational leadership. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in elementary education and biology from Winston-Salem State University and a master’s degree in educational administration and school superintendent’s certification from UNC Charlotte. Dr. Love holds a specialist degree in educational administration from Appalachian State University and a doctorate in educational administration from UNC Chapel Hill. He is a graduate of the Institute for Management and Leadership in Education at Harvard University. Dr. Love is very active in local, state and national educational organizations, including the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education Board of Examiners and the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation Board of Commissioners.

David Marlow

David Marlow, Ph.D. 
USC Upstate 
"Dialect Correctness and Assessment of Diverse Populations in the Classroom"

David Marlow is an associate professor of English, ESOL and linguistics at the University of South Carolina Upstate and holds a Ph.D. in English Linguistics and an M.S. in information science. He has taught ESOL in Japan, China and the U.S. His primary research interests involve students' involvement in class content, including technological enhancements, learner strategies and tolerance for linguistic difference. He is the founder of the South Carolina Language and Life Project (SCLLP), seeks to enhance understanding of dialect diversity and promote linguistic tolerance in South Carolina though education, community outreach and academic research. On the international level, he is involved in ongoing teacher training and research in Palacagüina, Nicaragua. At the core of all his endeavors, he seeks to make a meaningful difference in people’s lives.

Lesia Patterson

Lesia Patterson, D.D. 
Robert Anderson Middle School 
Do You Know Enough About Gifted Students to Teach Them?

Dr. Patterson is currently an Assistant Principal at Robert Anderson Middle School. She formerly has been an assistant principal at Glenview Middle School in Anderson; an Instructional Facilitator (organizing PAR Visit with the National Dropout Prevention Network) at Glenview Middle School in Anderson; Director of Support Programs for Anderson School District Five where she was appointed to the Executive Board of Directors for South Carolina Consortium of Gifted Education; Gifted and Talented Coordinator for Anderson School District Five; School-to-Work Coordinator for Anderson School District Five; Assistant Principal for Instruction at Westside High School; and Junior High & High School English Teacher at T.L. Hanna High School, Emerald Middle School, Clark Central High School and Pendleton Junior High. She most recently coordinated “get connected” workshop for parents and community to embrace communicating via technology. She has also presented at numerous conferences and has been Teacher of the Year three times.  

The South Carolina State Board of Education recognizes the need to provide gifted education services to identified students in grades 1-12. Gifted and talented students are those who are identified in grades 1-12 as demonstrating high performance ability or potential in academic and/or artistic areas. These students require an educational program beyond that normally provided by the general school program in order to achieve their potential. Giftedness is recognized and valued in children from all cultures and backgrounds. Teachers must maximize the potential of gifted and talented students through an appropriate curriculum responsive to individual learning rates, styles, and complexity, be abreast of the characteristics of gifted and talented students, and be able to implement effective practices to teach gifted and talented students.  This session will provide prospective educators with an overview of the SC Regulations, academic standards, strategic framework, and best practices for gifted and talented students.

Kelvin Wu

Kelvin Wu, Ph.D. 
USC Upstate 
"Implementing Technology to Exercise in Children with Lower Fitness"

Dr. Kelvin Wu is a native of Taiwan. He is an assistant professor in the Exercise and Sport Science program at the School of Education at the University of South Carolina Upstate. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he studied neurocognitive kinesiology. His research interests include assessing the effects of physical activity and exercise on cognitive function. Dr. Wu enthusiastically encourages students to be involved in hands-on learning and as well as critical thinking. His current research interest is examining how single bouts of aerobic exercise benefit attention.